Medications for Celiac Disease

Medications for Celiac Disease

Here are the basics about each of the medicines below. Only common problems with them are listed.

These medicines are used along with a gluten-free diet. They may be needed if the diet alone does not stop symptoms.

Prescription Medicines

Corticosteroids

  • Prednisone
  • Betamethasone
  • Clobetasone butyrate

Immunosuppressants

  • Azathioprine
  • Infliximab
  • Cyclosporine
  • Alemtuzumab
  • Cladribine

Medicine to treat itchy skin rash caused by celiac disease

  • Dapsone
  • Sulfonamide
  • Topical corticosteroids or antihistamines

Corticosteroids

Common names are:

  • Prednisone
  • Betamethasone
  • Clobetasone butyrate

These drugs can lower or stop inflammation in the intestines. They may be used with medicines to lower the immune system.

Some problems may be:

  • Stomach upset, nausea, or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • High blood pressure
  • Moodiness
  • Changes in appetite
  • Weight gain

Serious side effects are:

Immunosuppressants

Common names are:

  • Azathioprine
  • Infliximab
  • Cyclosporine
  • Alemtuzumab
  • Cladribine

These drugs lower the immune system. They may be given before or with a corticosteroid.

Some problems may be:

  • Infection
  • Anemia
  • Problems with blood clotting
  • Fever and chills
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Confusion

Medicine to Treat Skin Rash

Common names are:

  • Dapsone—antibiotic
  • Sulfonamide
  • Corticosteroids or antihistamine creams or lotions

Some problems may be:

  • Dry, red skin
  • Peeling skin
  • Allergic reaction
  • Joint swelling or pain
  • Belly pain
  • Lightheadedness
  • Symptoms of hemolytic anemia (dapsone):
    • Weakness
    • Paleness
    • Shortness of breath
    • Dark urine
    • Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes

References:

Caio G, Volta U, et al. Celiac disease: a comprehensive current review. BMC Med. 2019 Jul 23;17(1):142.
Celiac disease. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/condition/celiac-disease. Accessed January 4, 2021.
Celiac disease. Merck Manual Professional Version website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed January 4, 2021.
Poorly responsive celiac disease. Celiac Disease Foundation website. Available at: https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/poorly-responsive-celiac-disease. Accessed January 5, 2021.
Treatment for celiac disease. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website. Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/celiac-disease/treatment. Accessed January 5, 2021.
Last reviewed December 2020 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Daniel A. Ostrovsky, MD
Last Updated: 1/5/2021

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at healthlibrarysupport@ebsco.com. Our Health Library Support team will respond to your email request within 2 business days.

Home |Terms and Conditions |Concerned About Privacy? |Accessibility |Careers |For Employers and Medical Plan Providers

You may also be looking for: CVS/pharmacy | MinuteClinic | Specialty Pharmacy | SilverScript | Accordant